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"This Can't Be Florida!"

Joss and Norman Bierman had no thoughts of living in the Sunshine State. And then they visited Vero Beach.

The interior courtyard of the Bierman’s beach house combines water, vegetation, lounging furniture, and columns to create a sheltered haven for the owners. The pots beside the French doors to the master bedroom suite contain cypress plants which seem to dance.  A line of cabbage palms behind the south wall provides added privacy while a bunch of yellow daisies run riot by the edge of the pool.

The interior courtyard of the Bierman’s beach house combines water, vegetation, lounging furniture, and columns to create a sheltered haven for the owners. The pots beside the French doors to the master bedroom suite contain cypress plants which seem to dance.  A line of cabbage palms behind the south wall provides added privacy while a bunch of yellow daisies run riot by the edge of the pool.

Year-round residents Jocelyn (“Joss”) and Norman Bierman speak with unabashed enthusiasm about their 10 years at Windsor. They came to the community via a detour to the west coast of Florida. In the early 1990s, along with their daughter, Courtney, the Biermans spent a week at Seaside, a project conceived by the leading exponents of New Urbanism, Elizabeth Plater-Zybeck and Andres Duany. The Biermans were quartered in a charming cottage designed by Leon Krier and were delighted by Seaside’s village concept. They enjoyed the Gulf but missed the ocean, always a crucial factor in their lives. Several years later, when they discovered that the same award-winning designers had created a village called Windsor on the east coast, they flew down for a visit.

From the moment they arrived, the Biermans were intrigued by Windsor’s Anglo-Caribbean architecture. They admired the post office embellished with Grecian columns, the stunning decoration of the guest suites, the allee of oak trees at the entrance way and the stylish plantings and vegetation all around. “Even the obligatory guardhouse had character,” says Norman.

Read the entire article in the Summer 2010 issue