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A Symphony of Shapes

What do you get when you mix a Canadian philanthropist, a British gallery and a Brazilian artist? Vero Beach is about to find out.

Milhazes’ art has been described as “orchestral, with circular elements interweaving to form a symphony of color and shape.” The exhibition of her work is the first in a three-year curatorial partnership between London’s Whitechapel Gallery and The Gallery at Windsor.

Milhazes’ art has been described as “orchestral, with circular elements interweaving to form a symphony of color and shape.” The exhibition of her work is the first in a three-year curatorial partnership between London’s Whitechapel Gallery and The Gallery at Windsor.

In a brilliant blend of circles, dots and lines – straight, curved or quirky – Beatriz Milhazes’ favorite colors leap to life, forming the spirited patterns that captivate her viewers. Now, thanks to a three-year curatorial partnership between London’s venerable Whitechapel Gallery and The Gallery at Windsor, we have an opportunity to view the work of this internationally renowned Brazilian artist when her solo exhibition opens at Windsor on December 3.

Designed to explore the processes Milhazes uses to create her bold and abstract artworks, the event will include a display of archival materials, original drawings, acetates, woodblocks, loose-leaf books and screen prints. Central to the exhibition will be a series of screen and woodblock prints she made with Durham Press, a fine-art print publisher based in a turn-of-the-century schoolhouse in Bucks County, Pa., that produces limited edition contemporary prints with influential artists from around the world. Milhazes, who has two studios in Rio de Janeiro, has worked with Durham for 15 years.

The Gallery at Windsor, an intimate, light-filled space, has a history of presenting world-class contemporary artists. Mihazes was selected to initiate the partnership with Whitechapel Gallery that is designed to showcase the work of three artists at different stages in their careers. One will be of a rising star, one of a modern master and one of a canonical figure who is still influential today.

Read the entire article in the November 2011 issue