Fair   52.0F  |  Forecast »

March 2016

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Archive »

Dynamic Duo

Dynamic Duo

Each component of an extraordinary meal tells the story of a culinarian’s journey up through the ranks to success. Here in Vero Beach, we are blessed to have some of the finest and most talented chefs who dedicate their lives to making our gastronomical experiences memorable. This month, we talked to two such professionals from Grand Harbor, a premier residential community serving first-class cuisine.

A Tale of Three Towns

A Tale of Three Towns

In the spring of each year, usually sometime after the May Pops concert, a tribe of nearly 300 migrating Vero Beachers, of which I am one, empties freezers, puts up hurricane shutters and packs up cars. A few ship their vehicles ahead via transports where Mercedes perch like acrobats. A few decide to save 800 miles and freight their cars in the Amtrak Auto Train while they ride in coach; and some, like Connie and Bob Ferguson, toss their dogs, Sadie and Emma, into the back seat of their Volvo wagon and head north to Vermont.

A Fashionable Bit Of Italy In Vero Beach

A Fashionable Bit Of Italy In Vero Beach

They say that home is where the heart is. But what if your heart is torn between two equally captivating places that lie more than 8,000 miles apart? With the help of a wonderful business partner named Ann Marie Lloyd Shiff, a few good friends and some serendipitous circumstances, Stephanie Gore has brought a little bit of the Italy that she cherishes right here to her equally beloved city of Vero Beach.

Rite of Passage

Rite of Passage

Dr. Deb Walters is kayaking through icebergs. Sporting a bulky, yellow jacket and a tan hat whose wide brim reveals nothing but shadows, she wields a long paddle. One end pushes through frigid water; the other seems to point behind her, saying “Pay attention to where I’ve been.”

Second Nature

Second Nature

As she drove through the Everglades more than 10 years ago, Viola Pace Knudsen was inspired. After examining the work of an unassuming street artist who sold pine needle baskets, Viola returned to her own backyard, surveyed her 12 evergreens, and started collecting material.

Traveling El Camino De Santiago

Traveling El Camino De Santiago

Every year, thousands of pilgrims gather for a journey on a venerable path to a sacred and spiritual city, Santiago de Compostela in northwestern Spain. They will be hiking, biking or riding on the ancient Camino de Santiago – The Way of St. James. Pilgrims first trod this route in the 9th century in search of the bones of the apostle James in the city’s cathedral. James, later the patron saint of Spain, had been chosen by Jesus to spread the gospel there.

From Dark To Light

From Dark To Light

Owning a home in Florida was the furthest thing from Rich and Deb’s minds. To their way of thinking, the Sunshine State was for retirees who had a lot of free time on their hands. They were far too busy juggling work responsibilities and family activities. Yet after visiting friends who had discovered Vero Beach a few years earlier, the couple from Connecticut began to look at things differently.

Time & Time Again

Time & Time Again

We tend to think of our current calendar as an artifact that has been with us forever. But that is not the case at all. Over the centuries, starting as far back as 4000 B.C., the ancient Egyptians were using a solar calendar with 12 months of 30 days each for a 360-day calendar. They were way ahead of the ancient Greeks and Romans who were using a lunar calendar with only 10 months and a total of 264 days. January and February didn’t exist and the year started in March. Julius Caesar asked an Egyptian astronomer to devise a better calendar. The result was the Julian calendar with 12 months of 30 or 31 days and the outlier February. But the calendar still wasn’t quite right, so Italian doctor, astronomer and philosopher Luigi Lilio created the Gregorian calendar, the basis of today’s calendar.

Protecting An Artistic Heritage

Protecting An Artistic Heritage

Every piece of art at the Vero Beach Museum of Art – hanging on its walls, free standing in its galleries and sculpture parks, or stored in the vault – is constantly monitored for changes. Environmental elements, even those as benign as controlled artificial light, can affect a work of art. Add factors characteristic of Vero Beach’s weather and the proximity of the Atlantic Ocean and the demands of maintaining valuable artwork in pristine condition present a multitude of challenges. The heavy lifting – both literally and figuratively – for preserving the museum’s sculptures goes to Museum Conservator James Liccione.

A Place of Miracles

A Place of Miracles

The Scully-Welsh Cancer Center at the Indian River Medical Center is indeed miraculous. It was built on faith – not religious faith, per se, but faith in the future of health and healing in Vero Beach. It offers the best of the present: state-of-the-art technology; an affiliation with Duke Cancer Institute; the capacity for life-changing clinical trials; and a commitment to each patient’s physical, emotional and spiritual comfort. It was made possible by multiple donors, including Bill and Marlynn Scully and Pat and Carol Welsh. The two couples donated $12 million each, one half of the estimated $48 million capital campaign.