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A Farewell to Hadley

A new novel explores the ill-fated marriage of Ernest Hemingway and his first wife.

In The Paris Wife, “you understand what Hadley was feeling at each segment, from falling madly in love with Hemingway to the maturing of the relationship,” says Charlotte Terry.

In The Paris Wife, “you understand what Hadley was feeling at each segment, from falling madly in love with Hemingway to the maturing of the relationship,” says Charlotte Terry.

As well as being a leading Vero Beach Realtor, Charlotte Terry is president of the Laura (Riding) Jackson Foundation, which promotes literary programs in the community, and is past president of the Indian River Literary Society. As a staunch supporter of writers both published and non-published she is, of course, an avid reader.

Quick to name two of her favorite authors, Charlotte says that one is James Michener, whose early work about Afghanistan, Caravans, captivated her many years ago. The other is Ernest Hemingway.

“I love the cadence of his writing,” she says of Hemingway. But beyond the writing, there are several aspects of his early life that coincide with those of her own family. This has deepened her interest in the author.
Hemingway, the son of a physician, grew up in Oak Park, Ill. Charlotte, also the daughter of a physician, lived in Oak Park during the time that her father, Dr. John Terry, was interning at Rush Presbyterian Hospital in Chicago.

Both the Terrys and the Hemingways had summer homes in Michigan. The Terrys’ home was built by Dr. Terry’s father in 1939, and Charlotte still spends some time each summer at the cottage in Frankfort on Lake Michigan. As a child, Hemingway spent summers at his family’s summer home in Walloon Lake.

Read the entire article in the January 2012 issue