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Right Place at the Wrong Time

After a narrow escape on 9/11, this St. Edward’s graduate has scaled the slippery slopes of international finance.

As CEO of Credit Suisse’s Private Banking Americas division, Anthony DeChellis is constantly on the move between his New York office, the bank’s headquarters in Zurich and the financial centers of Central and South America.

As CEO of Credit Suisse’s Private Banking Americas division, Anthony DeChellis is constantly on the move between his New York office, the bank’s headquarters in Zurich and the financial centers of Central and South America.

Anthony DeChellis entered Saint Edward’s School in the fall of 1974 as a sixth grader. It was shortly after the DeChellis family moved from New Jersey, settled in The Moorings and enrolled the four boys in the school.

Anthony remembers the year well. He was assigned to the homeroom of science teacher Bruce Wachter (now head of Saint Edward’s upper school). The classroom was located outside of the science lab, which housed a boa constrictor and white mice among other creatures. The lab was also the nominal home to Sam, the teacher’s Woolley monkey that roamed the campus freely as pet and mascot to the lower school students.

But sharing classroom space with a beloved monkey was just one of the differences the transfer student noted. “With the smaller class size and more personal attention, it was quite different from the larger and more diverse Northeast school environment I was accustomed to,” Anthony comments from his office at the United States headquarters of Credit Suisse in New York. “But the experience taught me how to transition and adapt to different environments and cultures. It’s a skill that I didn’t realize at the time would serve me very well years later.”nthony DeChellis entered Saint Edward’s School in the fall of 1974 as a sixth grader. It was shortly after the DeChellis family moved from New Jersey, settled in The Moorings and enrolled the four boys in the school.

Anthony remembers the year well. He was assigned to the homeroom of science teacher Bruce Wachter (now head of Saint Edward’s upper school). The classroom was located outside of the science lab, which housed a boa constrictor and white mice among other creatures. The lab was also the nominal home to Sam, the teacher’s Woolley monkey that roamed the campus freely as pet and mascot to the lower school students.

Read the entire article in the April 2010 issue